Blogs and Voices

The Advocate has released its list of top political and Gay(ish) blogs. The line seems a little blurred to me—Joe.My.God seems to fit in the same category as TowleRoad, while Pam’s House Blend seems to be pretty political and less general—but it’s still an interesting couple of lists.

Top Political Blogs

The Bilerico Project
Gay Patriot
Immigration Equality Blog
BlogActive
David Mixner
Politico
Joe.My.God.
HRC Backstory
Chris Crain
Daily Beast
Drudge Retort
Andrew Sullivan
FiveThirtyEight
Gay Politics/Victory Fund

Top Gay(ish) Blogs

AmericaBlog.com
Gawker.com
DListed.com
HuffingtonPost.com
GoodAsYou.org
OhLaLaMag.com
Signorile.com
TowleRoad.com
WorldofWonder.net

PerezHilton.com
Slog.TheStranger.com
PamsHouseBlend.com
PinkIsTheNewBlog.com
Popnography.com
Rod 2.0

A few observations. First, congratulations to the folks who made the list because this kind of work is not easy.  Many of these folks–Mixner, Rogers, Aravosis, Savage–have been able to parlay their influence into a broader role as “spokesmen” for the movement.

(For an interesting take on whether bloggers are leaders of the LGBT movement, Duncan Osborne contacted a few people on these lists to see whether they see themselves as leaders)

What’s also striking about the list–and it is a challenge all journalism has, not just “citizen journalists”–is the homogeneity of the voices. The list is made up almost exclusively of gay, white men from urban, coastal centers. The political slants tend to be left-of-center or progressive. Largely missing are women’s voices, trans voices, and the voices of non-white people.  Even the group blogs are dominated by gay, white voices.

If new media and citizen journalism is the future of journalism, how do we increase the diversity of voices?

4 Responses

  1. It’s an interesting list and we certainly do read quite a few of them. But we wonder, where are the voices of transgender and bisexual community(s) in all of that?

  2. Huh, it is interesting that the list is particularly homogeneous. You are right that this is absolutely something we should be working against. One of the main short comings of traditional journalism has been its homogeneity and I would hope that citizen journalism would work as a force against this. Without a doubt there is a diversity of voices out there blogging. It seems, however, that they are not receiving the attention that more “mainstream” voices are. This is, I suspect, a limiting force still built into the system of even citizen journalism which needs to be opposed, perhaps through an asserted effort at “discovering” and publicizing new and different voices. There are some great interviews with top journalists about the future of journalism at http://www.ourblook.com/component/option,com_sectionex/Itemid,200076/id,8/view,category/#catid69 which I have found useful.

  3. I wonder whether these point to the reality that gay, white men are the main consumers of these blogs. I wonder how the demographics of JoeMyGod differ from the demographics of Pam\’s House Blend. JMG\’s readers seem to be people who are a lot like Joe himself and discussions of race suggests his demographic is very white and at time not terribly tolerant of women and non-whites.

  4. […] at RE:ACT, the official blog of the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists’ […]

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